Cleaning Carpets the Green Way

This is a guest post by Sarah Smith. Sarah is a small business owner and is currently learning about the environment, using the Internet. Aside from working on her own business, she likes to use social media and read travel books.

Many common household cleaners are full of harmful chemicals, and carpet-cleaning products are no exception. It is probably easier than you think to keep carpets clean and fresh without resorting to unhealthy cleaning products that can harm you and the environment.

Vacuuming

Carpets should be vacuumed at least once a week. Even if your home is very clean, dust will settle on carpeting and should be removed. The longer dust or dirt is allowed to sit on carpet, the more it settles into the fibers and the harder it is to remove. Choose the best vacuum cleaner you can find. It should have great suction and attachments for getting to hard to reach places. Read more…

Refreshing Herbal Iced Tea from Loose Leaves

In this hot weather, it’s important to drink plenty of water…but plain water gets boring. Soft drinks and juices are expensive and bad for your teeth, unless they are sugar-free and sweetened with weird chemicals.

Here is a calorie-free, caffeine-free drink that tastes great without any sweetener and even has health benefits!

I make herbal tea by the pitcher, using a combination of red raspberry leaves and peppermint leaves. I can buy both of these inexpensively in bulk at my local food co-op, but sometimes my mom gives me peppermint from her garden. Raspberry leaves do not taste much like the berries, just sort of leafy and mildly fruity. They are high in Vitamin C and healthy for everyone, but they are especially good for women about to give birth, postpartum, or menstruating because they help the uterus contract smoothly. I use peppermint mainly for its delicious flavor and cooling effect, but it may have health benefits, too. Both herbs are supposed to be good for digestion.

Here is my technique for making the tea: Read more…

Centerpiece

Our nine-year-old Nicholas has been interested in home decorating since he was about four years old. I often get frustrated with his desire to set up things that are merely decorative, have no useful purpose, and just get in my way! I am even more irritated when he wants to buy things just for decorating. I like our home to look clean and pleasant, but I feel we have enough stuff around without cluttering up the place with decorations.

However, I have learned that sometimes decorations help to motivate the family–myself included–to keep a space cleaner and neater, so that we can appreciate the decorations instead of losing them in the clutter or letting them be obscured by dust. The dining table centerpiece is a good example.

Read more…

Water Saving Devices for the Home

This is a guest post by Sarah Smith. Sarah is a small business owner and is currently learning about the environment, using the Internet. Aside from working on her own business, she likes to use social media and read travel books.

Saving water saves money and reduces the energy used in water treatment, but I have never been all that great at saving water, so I am pleased to have this guest post explaining how to do it painlessly as you upgrade your plumbing.

Latest Technology

If the water bills for your home are increasing drastically, then it is time to install new fixtures in the laundry room, kitchen and bathroom. One of the best ways to understand the most appropriate water saving devices to install in your home is to consult with a plumber. A knowledgeable technician from a plumbing company understands the latest technologies available to reduce water usage while also providing an attractive appearance. Read more…

Why I Spent My Birthday Money on Socks

My partner’s grandfather, Herschel, has a tradition of giving everyone a birthday gift of the number of dollars that matches her age, so he gave me $41 last month. I used it to order 8 pairs of socks from Maggie’s Organics.

What a boring gift! It brings to mind the 1980s “Saturday Night Live” skit in which Hanukkah Harry, the Jewish counterpart of Santa Claus, brings a good little child a big box of…socks. Why didn’t I spend this money on something luxurious and fun?!

Read more…

Recycling Used-Up Pens and Markers

This is a guest post by Nicholas Efran, nine-year-old son of ‘Becca and Daniel. He wrote this article for the June 2014 issue of the Colfax Communicator, his school‘s newsletter. (Mr. Sikorski is the principal.) We hope it inspires other kids to start recycling things that are getting thrown away in their schools!

Three third-graders started a recycling program for used-up markers, pens, and highlighters at Colfax. Nicholas Efran, Sadie Rothaus, and Emma Reints got enthusiastic support from Mr. Sikorski in setting up bins around the school, next to the staircase entrances. Anyone may bring their used-up pens, markers, and highlighters from home, as well as those used in school. Read more…

Vegetarianism and Animal Rights: Explaining to Children

Welcome to the June 2014 Carnival of Natural Parenting: Kids and Animals

This post was written for inclusion in the monthly Carnival of Natural Parenting hosted by Code Name: Mama and Hobo Mama. This month our participants have shared stories and wisdom about kids and animals.

***

When my cousin Samantha was three years old and I was in college, I was visiting her family and we were eating chicken for dinner when Samantha asked, “What is chicken made of?’”

Her mother took a deep breath and said, “Well, chicken is made of a chicken.

Samantha’s eyes widened. To make certain she really understood what her mom was saying, she asked, “Chicken, buk-buk?” making a pecking motion with her hand. Her mom confirmed that the meat on our plates was indeed parts of a chicken who once pecked and said buk-buk. Samantha didn’t freak out, but she was surprised and sad and didn’t eat any more chicken at that meal.

The idea that people can eat animals startles many children when they first hear about it. Some parents want to prevent children from knowing that meat is animal flesh until they’re much older, to prevent objections that might complicate family mealtimes. I don’t like the idea of hiding such a basic truth about food from the people to whom it’s served, so I’m glad I witnessed Samantha’s response to this fact a decade before I became a mother; it gave me plenty of time to think about how I would handle my children’s questions about meat-eating. Read more…

The Best Alarm Clock-Radio to Buy Used

…is a Sony Dream Machine with EZ Alarm, made around 1988. You do not want a recent Dream Machine as it is a completely different product. This is an excellent clock:

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My dad gave it to me for Christmas when I was 15. Its radio reception was far superior to my previous clock-radio; no more holding the power cord in the air with my foot to enhance the signal!

The best feature of this clock is the way you set the alarm. A small switch on the top left sets it to beep, radio, or no alarm. Then you set the alarm time using those nice big dials on the front: one for hours, one for minutes. Read more of this post

What to do if your baby spits up blood

Well, of course you should call your doctor if you see any trace of blood–either red streaks or dark brown grainy-looking stuff–in your baby’s spit-up. Blood in the digestive tract can be a symptom of something terribly wrong that needs immediate treatment. But while you are waiting for that call back from the doctor, I encourage you to do one simple thing that just might help you calm down about this very alarming symptom.

Take a look at your nipples.

(That’s if you are the baby’s mother and you are breastfeeding. If you are the father, grandmother, etc., or if you are a bottle-feeding mother, your nipples are not relevant.)

It’s very common for a breastfeeding mother, especially one who has just started nursing a newborn baby, to experience skin irritation from the pressure and pulling of nursing and/or the exposure of the skin to saliva. This can get so bad that the skin cracks and bleeds a little. It happened to me within the first week of nursing Nicholas, so I was not surprised to see little scabs on my nipples by the time Lydia was four days old. I continued applying lanolin after every feeding and taking ibuprofen to reduce the pain so that I could continue tolerating nursing, knowing that in a few weeks my skin would adjust and my baby’s mouth would grow so that it didn’t hurt so much. This is an unpleasant stage, but I got through it before and knew I could endure it again. Read more…

The Towel Pull: A Helpful Childbirth Technique

Our daughter Lydia is now ten days old! She had a nice natural birth at the Midwife Center. The most difficult part was getting her head out, and for that I used a technique that also was very effective at that stage in the birth of our son nine years ago. Both times, one of the nurses was familiar with this technique while the other birth attendants were not–so I am spreading the word!

It’s called the Towel Pull or Tug of War. You, the mother, hold onto one end of a towel twisted the long way to form a sort of rope. Someone else holds the other end, or you tie it around a bar over the bed if there is one. You rest lying on your back with knees bent. When a contraction comes, you pull on the towel, curl your back forward, and pull your knees back and apart as far as you can, so you are making a C shape curved around your uterus.

It sounds like a lot of extra effort that could divert your energy from pushing. It sounds like ridiculous gymnastics. But it really works!

Read more…

Bean Wraps with Smoked Gouda and Pineapple

Last Saturday, despite being extremely pregnant, I managed to attend and enjoy both a very nice birthday party at a nature reserve and the springtime celebration of the Edible Schoolyard at my son’s school–but then I was very tired.  On the way home from the school event, I asked nine-year-old Nicholas to help me think of something quick and easy we could make for dinner after I’d had some time to lie down.

He was eager to eat some of the smoked gouda cheese I had bought at Trader Joe’s on the way home from the birthday party.  (To my surprise, it cost only a little more than basic cheeses like cheddar at our supermarket.)  He also remembered that I’d bought tortillas.  “Let’s have a different flavor of bean burritos!”

I felt that cannellini beans (white kidney beans) would be the variety most likely to taste good with smoked gouda.  I thought some kind of fruit might be good with them, but we didn’t have apples or pears, hmmm…

Nicholas found a can of pineapple rings in the pantry and announced that he would grill them on the George Foreman grill.  This went well, although it was kind of smoky–we opened the window!  He used the drip tray to catch the juice that ran off, and used the sort of fingered spatula thing that comes with the grill to scrape off the blackened pineapple juice after each ring.  While he was doing that, I heated and seasoned the beans.

Our bean wraps were delicious!  Very gourmet, almost bacon-like flavor.  Here’s the recipe we invented!

To make 3 main-dish servings, you will need:

  • 2 cans or 1 1/2 cups cooked cannellini beans (or other mild-flavored beans)
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 1/2 tsp. dried tarragon
  • sea salt and white pepper to taste (I used about 1/2 tsp. of each)
  • about 1/5 pound smoked gouda cheese
  • 3 large flour tortillas (Alternatively, I bet this would taste great wrapped in lettuce leaves, for a low-carb/gluten-free variant.)
  • 6 pineapple rings

Peel and slice the garlic.  Saute in olive oil in a large skillet, not too hot.  Meanwhile, drain and rinse the beans.  When garlic begins to brown, add beans, tarragon, salt, and pepper to skillet.  Cook for about 7 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Meanwhile, dice the cheese, and grill the pineapple (or brown it in a smaller skillet or in the toaster-oven) if desired.

Sprinkle cheese over surface of beans.  Cover pan and turn off heat.  Warm the tortillas (or wash the lettuce).  Cut each pineapple ring in half.

Divide bean mixture evenly among wraps.  Arrange 4 half-rings of pineapple atop the beans in each wrap.  Wrap them up.

Visit the Hearth & Soul Blog Hop for more great recipes! Visit Works-for-Me Wednesday and Waste Not Want Not Wednesday for lots of useful tips!

Green Tips for a Green Garden

This is a guest post by Sarah Smith.  Sarah is a small business owner and is currently learning about the environment, using the Internet.  Aside from working on her own business, she likes to use social media and read travel books.

Unwanted pests are always popping up in the garden.  These can ruin flowers or other plants around the yard. Instead of using dangerous chemical pesticides as a means of pest control, there are organic alternatives that
work just as well.  Here are some tips to keep your garden green and free of pests.

Encourage Birds to Visit

Birds are a great way to control unwanted pests because they eat insects.  To welcome birds into a garden, it may be wise to add a bird bath into the area and plant items that attract birds.  For instance, sunflowers are a
great addition to the garden: Besides attracting birds, they can create a useful hedge that keeps other animals away.  Since installing a birdbath, I am now looking at a bird feeder to bring even more of nature’s winged creatures into my garden.

Appreciate the “Beneficial” Bugs

Not all insects are bad.  For example, ladybugs and green lacewings are very good for pest control.  These bugs feed on insects like the aphid that cause damage to garden plants.  It is possible to naturally attract these
“beneficial” bugs with water and herb plants.  It is also possible to purchase these bugs online in the egg stage or as adults, if you don’t have the patience to attract these “insects that eat other insects” into your garden.

Cover with Netting

Some people use the barrier method as a way to keep pests away.  Food plants are commonly protected with a large net.  This prevents unwanted insects from eating the plants but still allows sunlight to penetrate for proper development.  A net is one of the simplest and least expensive ways to preserve a plant and be kind to the environment as well.  I felt I just couldn’t bear to cover my beautiful garden with a net, but it might prove a useful stopgap measure for those trying to get their garden under control.

Organic Insecticide

It is possible to create an organic insecticide from basic pantry ingredients.  To begin, blend 15 cloves of garlic, one onion, three cayenne peppers, and four cups of warm water into a puree.  Place the mixture in a glass jar and steep for one day.  Then strain the mixture and mix in 1/2 teaspoon of liquid castile soap.  Pour the liquid into a spray bottle and apply throughout the garden.  Any remaining amount can be refrigerated and stored for up to two months.  It is important to avoid skin contact because the pepper may cause burns–and please, keep it out of reach of children!

Natural pest control is a safe and efficient way to protect a garden from unwanted insects.  Chemical pesticides are often ineffective and harmful.  Some of the above tips have helped me personally as a gardener to protect my plants from intrusion, while other tips are anecdotal, based on what I’ve learnt from friends and neighbours.  In the end, it is possible to enjoy a lush lawn, beautiful greenery, or tasty fruits and vegetables without worry.

Visit Waste Not Want Not Wednesday for more efficient and natural ideas!  Visit Works-for-Me Wednesday for more helpful tips on many topics!

Why we didn’t have a Gender Reveal Party

This post is not meant to criticize parents who make different decisions, just to explain our point of view.

“Do you know what you’re having?”  I am in my last month of pregnancy, and oh, how tired I am of that strangely-phrased question!  I just smile and say, “It’s a baby!”  Of course that doesn’t stop the interrogation, because what people want to know is whether it’s a boy or a girl.  The more reasonable way to ask this question, in my opinion, is, “Did you find out the sex?”

This time around, my answer to that question is a bit more complicated than it was in my first pregnancy, when we did not know our baby was a boy until he was born.  My policy is still the same: If I am having testing for medical reasons that also happens to reveal the sex of the baby, then I want to know what it says.  I don’t like the idea of hospital personnel knowing when I don’t.  But I would not have a test primarily so that we can know the sex before birth.  In my first pregnancy, the only medically indicated ultrasound was too early to tell the sex.  I did not have any further testing because there was no reason to think anything was wrong.  This time, because I’m 40 and therefore at higher risk of some birth defects, I decided to have a 20-week ultrasound and non-invasive genetic testing.  So we know the sex, but we’re keeping it a secret from most people.  Some people like the suspense, and others are badgering us, hoping to get us to slip up. :eyesroll

Why not find out, and why not tell everyone when we know? Read more…

Asbestos Awareness Week

I’ve been asked to share the link to this site about asbestos and mesothelioma.  Dying to Be Heard explains how asbestos causes mesothelioma, a cancer which is quickly fatal in most people, and tells one survivor’s story.  It also explains how to find out whether you are being exposed to asbestos and what to do about it.  Many Americans think of asbestos as something that was banned decades ago, but in fact it’s still legal and is still used in some products–just not as many as it used to be.  This site tells you how to recognize those products and choose alternatives.

Asbestos is just one example of a substance that was thought to be safe and was widely used until health problems appeared long after exposure.  It’s a great reminder of why we need to be cautious about using new substances.  Check out Our Stolen Future for the latest findings about chemicals that disrupt the human endocrine system (glands and hormones) causing birth defects, cancers, and other health problems.

Saving Money on Sports Fan Gear

We aren’t sports fans in our family.  Exercise is good, but we’re not much interested in playing sports and even less interested in watching sports.

But we live in Pittsburgh, a city with three professional sports teams that are a major focus of the local culture.  We can’t help noticing when one of the teams is doing well: We see people wearing black and gold even more often than normal, all the city buses have some slogan like “Beat ‘em Bucs!” flashing across their foreheads in between route announcements, and we know when a game has been won because we hear people hollering, “Woo!!” as they drive down the main street behind our house.  Sometimes even we feel caught up in rooting for the home team–after all, it’s in our best interest for our fellow citizens to be happy instead of dejected.

When our son Nicholas was four years old, the Steelers made it to the Super Bowl.  Attending preschool that fall and winter, he could not help noticing that all the other kids had Steelers shirts and the teachers were constantly talking about Steelers.  This was not the first time he’d asked for a Steelers shirt, or a Penguins shirt, or a Pirates shirt–these garments are popular even among the youngest children and typically are pretty sharp-looking compared to standard little kids’ clothes–but this was the point at which Daniel and I began to think it might really make sense to get him one.  We believe that resisting peer pressure is a valuable skill and have modeled questioning what “everybody” does, but we also remember the feeling of wanting to fit in with our classmates.  While we aren’t really into sports, we don’t think they’re a terrible evil to be avoided on principle.

The trouble is that official licensed sports team logo gear is expensive.  We didn’t want to pay $20 for a tiny shirt our kid would outgrow in a year!  But the cheap knock-off gear is not only less attractive and poorly made, it’s technically illegal.  Luckily, we learned two handy ways around this dilemma:

  1. When the team is winning successive rounds of championships, the merchandise commemorating the previous win will go on sale.  Nicholas didn’t mind at all that his first Steelers shirt said something about divisional champs.  We picked it up for $6 in the supermarket the week after the Steelers’ next victory.
  2. Kids outgrow their team shirts, and these tend to be sturdy garments that are re-sold in good condition.  There’s nothing illegal about this, as the team received the licensing fee at the first purchase.  We’ve picked up half a dozen Steelers, Penguins, and Pirates shirts for $2 or $3 at Goodwill or yard sales.

It works for me!  Visit Waste Not Want Not Wednesday and Fabulously Frugal Thursday and Thrifty Thursday for more money-saving ideas!

Fishgiving: A Feast from the Freezer!

Last weekend, my family enjoyed a spontaneous and somewhat silly holiday feast.

A few days earlier, we had finally gotten around to baking an acorn squash and two butternut squashes we’d received in our CSA farm share back in November.  Each of the three of us ate a big chunk of squash as a side dish to the Honey Baked Lentils we baked at the same time.  Actually, I like to eat my lentils in the mashed and buttered squash, and I packed up another portion for my lunch the next day.

Then we were left with 5 servings of baked squash and no more lentils.  On Saturday I asked my nine-year-old Nicholas to help me decide what to make for dinner with the squash–Butternut Squash Burritos?  No, he wanted it to be a side dish to something.  Okay, how about fish?  We had 4 fillets and some odd bits left in a big bag of frozen pollock.  Nicholas agreed to a meal of fish and squash.

Suddenly he said, “Can we make the squash like Grandma’s sweet potatoes?”  I was sure that we could adapt the New England Yam Bake recipe to the squash.  Nicholas and his father Daniel were planning to go to the supermarket in the afternoon anyway, so I checked the recipe and the pantry and put canned pineapple on the shopping list.

I was getting out the fish to thaw when Nicholas had another inspiration: “Since we’re having the squash like at Thanksgiving, can we have cranberry sauce?”  We happened to have a can of cranberry sauce in the pantry–and thinking of Thanksgiving reminded me that we still had a quart of stuffing and a quart of mashed potatoes in the freezer!  (We were among the few relatives who traveled by car rather than plane to Daniel’s family’s large Thanksgiving gathering, so we brought home all the leftovers we could manage.)  I got those out to thaw, too.

We baked the fish plain, with just a little olive oil for moisture.  We scooped the squash out of its skin and mashed it into a large flat baking pan, put the pineapple on top, and mixed up the crumblies according to the Yam Bake recipe.  Nicholas coaxed the cranberry sauce out of the can onto our official cranberry sauce server, which Daniel and I bought at a yard sale years ago when we were first living together because we just couldn’t resist the idea that for only 50 cents we could own a crystal plate and silver serving tool specifically designed for the elegant serving of canned gelatinous cranberry sauce!  (We think it’s from the 1950s, judging by the art on the box.)

Fish with Thanksgiving side dishes is just as good as turkey.  The squash bake was excellent.  We really enjoyed our festive meal!  Nicholas began speaking of “Fishgiving Dinner,” and I tried to make up a legend about how this was the commemoration of how the Indians taught our ancestors to eat fish, but he wasn’t buying it.  We had enough left over from our meal of leftovers to reprise Fishgiving Dinner on Sunday night.

Enjoying the autumn harvest to the fullest, with a random celebration in March, works for me!  Visit the Hearth & Soul Blog Hop for more food-related articles!  Visit Waste Not Want Not Wednesday and Fabulously Frugal Thursday for more ways to make the most of what you’ve got!

How to use long-frozen cookie dough

When my parents visited us the Christmas before last, my mother made her grandmother’s traditional animal cookies: a buttery dough that you roll out and cut with cookie cutters (they don’t have to be animal shapes, of course) and bake and frost.  The recipe makes a huge batch, so she divided it and froze two portions, and we made cookies from the rest.

My son Nicholas and I defrosted one blob of cookie dough last spring and baked cookies for church coffee hour.  But the other blob was still sitting in our freezer, 15 months later.  I was beginning to wonder if it was still good and how we might get around to baking some cookies, because I’m seven months pregnant and would like to be filling that freezer space with leftovers to eat postpartum, but I’m so tired so much of the time that rolling out cookies does not seem to be within my capabilities.

One evening last week, nine-year-old Nicholas ate a healthy dinner and then asked for a bowl of berries (we have a big bag of frozen organic mixed berries from Costco, which we’ve been defrosting in the microwave one serving at a time) with yogurt.  I had to tell him I had finished off the yogurt at breakfast.  He was upset.  Berries with milk would not be as good.  We did not have ice cream.  After a while he started asking for “a bready topping”.  No, NOT oatmeal!  Finally I thought of the cookie dough.

We removed the blob of dough from its plastic bag and put it on a plate in the microwave on “defrost” setting.  After 5 minutes the dough was workable.  We defrosted about 2 cups of berries, warming them just to the point where they weren’t stuck together or too icy to handle.  Nicholas formed the dough into 7 pancake-like circles and wrapped each one around a handful of berries.  We put the blobs in a baking pan, poked the tops with a fork, and baked at 350F until they were crusty on the outside, about 15 minutes.  They got larger and stuck together, but they were easy to separate with a spatula.

The result was a sort of dumpling that could be hand-held while eating.  They tasted great!  The cookie dough was sweet enough that the berries didn’t need additional sugar to taste like dessert.  The dough wasn’t stale or freezer-flavored at all.  (I’m impressed, given that our refrigerator+freezer malfunctioned for several months last year before we decided to replace it, so everything from the freezer got semi-thawed and refrozen at least once.)  A little bit of berry juice had leaked through the crust, but the dumplings weren’t soggy, probably because Nicholas ate the last layer of berries at the bottom of the bowl and most of the juice from thawing was down there.

Using the old cookie dough to make fruit dumplings worked for me!  Visit the Hearth & Soul Blog Hop for more food-related articles!  Visit Fabulously Frugal Thursday for more ways to make the most of what you’ve got!

Tips On Running Your Diesel Generator Efficiently

This is a guest post by Sarah Smith.  Sarah is a small business owner and is currently learning about the environment, using the Internet.  Aside from working on her own business, she likes to use social media and read travel books.  I was interested to learn about how diesel generators can be used most efficiently, because I’ve always lived in places connected to a power grid, so I have no experience with generators.

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If you live in a rural area, especially off the main electrical grid, diesel generators are critical tools to have for everyday power needs. From powering a dishwasher to a power drill, these workhorses offer inexpensive energy for many hours of use. However, diesel is a fossil fuel, emitting fumes into the atmosphere. If you are environmentally conscious, you can still run your generator safely with some basic efficiency tips.

Choose The Large Model

When you are in the market for diesel generators, look for a large model. Small generators naturally have smaller engines, requiring them to operate at high RPMs, or revolutions per minute. These high RPMs consume copious amounts of diesel. Although diesel’s exhaust is not as toxic as gasoline, you do not want to add excessive fumes to the air, or purchase a lot of diesel as replacement.

Large models have bigger engines, allowing them to produce ample power at lower RPMs. Fuel is burned more efficiently, saving you money and preserving the environment.

Part Of A Whole

Read more…

A Real Man

A Real Man does not mind carrying the groceries in a canvas tote bag with colorful tulips printed on it.

A Real Man knows how to cook a meal, wash the dishes, do the laundry, mop a floor, and sew on a button.  He considers these basic survival skills that everyone should know by the age of 18, at latest.

A Real Man will hug a friend who is upset and wants to be hugged, even if that friend is another man.

A Real Man appreciates being offered a choice of pink or orange highlighter marker, instead of getting offended that you didn’t just hand him the orange one.

A Real Man does not run away screaming whenever menstruation or childbirth is mentioned.

A Real Man responds to his four-year-old child’s request for purple sparkly shoes by asking, “Do they have grippy soles for rock climbing?”–whether the child is a boy or a girl. Read more…

Four Weeks of Mostly Meatless Dinners (February)

I’m not using the term “pesco-vegetarian” in the title like I have for many of my other multi-week meal plans because I think “meatless” is the more common word people are searching for in Lent.  My family eats no meat at home except occasional fish–which does not count as “meat” in many fasting plans, for some reason–so our menus are ideal for Lenten fasting or any time you want to avoid eating red meat and poultry.  Recently, I have been eating meat in restaurants a bit more often than usual because I’m seven months pregnant and have developed anemia, and the iron from turkey and beef is supposed to be the most absorbable…but in general, I still prefer a low-meat diet.

This menu features two new gadgets we got for Christmas: a slow cooker and a Vidalia Chop Wizard.  We’re finding both of them to be pretty useful.

Here’s what we ate for dinners in February.  Our weekday lunches are leftovers and occasional restaurant meals for the adults and a lunchbox meal (using leftovers where feasible) for third-grader Nicholas.  Weekend lunches tend to be leftovers, too; the ones that weren’t, or that made some notable use of the leftovers, are listed here.  I plan the menu, but my partner Daniel cooks our weeknight dinners so they’re ready when I get home from work, while I cook on the weekends and sometimes prepare ingredients during the week.

Week One:

  • Sunday:
    • Lunch: Pizza and salad left over from the previous night, when we had friends over for dinner.  They brought a “salad bar” (greens, shredded carrot, cherry tomatoes, avocado, and beets in separate containers) and we bought the pizza at Mineo’s.  I made Italian salad dressing–I don’t really have a recipe, but my method goes something like this: In a glass jar, put 2 parts olive oil and 1 part apple cider vinegar; sprinkle in plenty of sea salt, black pepper, dried minced onion, and granulated garlic and smaller amounts of dried red pepper flakes, nutritional yeast flakes, dried basil, dried oregano, and dried parsley; close jar tightly and shake it; taste it and adjust as needed; set jar inside a shallow dish to protect the tablecloth from oily drips.  This dressing can be stored at room temperature for a couple weeks.
    • Dinner: Lemon Creamy Salmon with Tangy Greens.  I used frozen kale for the greens and heated up leftover rice for my carbohydrate and leftover whole-wheat couscous for the guys.  Now we had a second jar of homemade salad dressing, a different flavor; I put them side by side in a small oval dish. Read more…