Whole-wheat Zucchini Bread

This is a great high-fiber food for breakfast, snacks, or side dish and an excellent way to use the zucchini that is abundant at this time of year.  I just made a batch yesterday and served it with baked beans from a can (traditional Fourth of July food, and easy to prepare after all that baking!) for a nutritious meal to kind of counter-act whatever we might eat at the party today.  I started making zucchini bread a few years ago using a recipe I’d gotten from a co-worker, but now I’ve made enough modifications that I consider it my own, different recipe.

I started with 5 small-to-medium zucchini from our weekly farm share, shredded them in the food processor, and measured the shreds.  This is how I decide how many loaves to make: Each loaf requires 1 cup of shredded zucchini, and I have 4 loaf pans, so if I have at least 4 cups then I can make 4 loaves (for maximum efficiency in heating the oven and in using my own energy), and then I freeze any extra shredded zucchini, labeling the bag to show how many cups it is, and I can use it to make zucchini bread in the winter or to supplement a smaller weekly share of zucchini.  This time, I had 6 cups, so I froze 2 cups and made 4 loaves.

For each loaf of zucchini bread, you will need: Read more of this post

Cheesy Zucchini Casserole

This recipe came about when my ten-year-old Nicholas rejected the first two ideas I proposed for using the enormous zucchini we got in our farm share: (1) “Nooo! We still have zucchini bread from last time!” and (2) “Nothing with tomato sauce unless it is a pizza.”  Hmmm… I remembered a casserole recipe from some magazine that I made a couple of times in the 1990s but threw out in the transition from recipe cards to our recipe binder because it called for canned soup and saltine crackers and we just weren’t keeping those things on hand anymore.  That casserole had corn in it; Nicholas likes corn, and we have a huge bag of frozen organic corn.  (By the way, zucchini and corn are two vegetables that are important to buy organic to avoid genetically modified organisms.)  Instead of the soup, we could use cheese to hold it together.  What other farm produce did we need to use up?  Garlic scapes and the dill from a couple weeks ago that I’d hung up to dry.

[UPDATE: I made this again in December using frozen zucchini and corn left over from Thanksgiving.  See the note at the bottom for help with frozen zucchini–it did turn out well, but it required some techniques I learned from previous mishaps in other recipes!]

I didn’t measure anything, but I can tell you approximately what you’ll need to make a 10″x15″ casserole:

  • 1 medium-sized zucchini (If you have a giant one, grate the whole thing and freeze excess in appropriate portions for future recipes.)
  • 2 cups corn kernels (If they’re frozen, just measure the 2 cups and set out at room temperature to thaw while you prepare the rest of the food.  It’s okay if they still feel icy when going into the oven; they’re small and will cook well enough in the end.)
  • 4 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 7 garlic scapes, or 3 cloves garlic
  • 2 tsp. dried dill
  • 1 tsp. dried tarragon
  • 1/2 tsp. dried basil
  • 1/2 tsp. dried oregano
  • 1/2 tsp. sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp. white pepper (Black pepper would be fine if you don’t have white.)
  • 1 1/2 cups grated cheddar or monterey jack cheese (You can grate extra cheese and freeze it, too, or just set it aside for another meal requiring grated cheese.)

Read more of this post

Zucchini Tofu

Meatless MondayHere is my favorite tofu recipe.  Although it’s sort of Chinese-like, I cook it more slowly over lower heat than an authentic Chinese stir-fry, which gives the onions a very different flavor.  Quantities are VERY approximate; basically it’s “season to taste”.  When zucchini is not in season, you can use frozen zucchini, thawed and drained–but it should be cut in wedges or slices, not shredded, to work well in this recipe.  Yellow summer squash with a soft peel, or with the peel removed, can be substituted for zucchini. Read more…