Lemon Creamy Salmon photo tutorial!

Lent is about half over.  If you’re fasting from meat during Lent, and you normally eat a lot of meat, by now you’re probably getting kind of bored with fish sticks and macaroni-and-cheese.  Time to try something new!

I’ve posted this recipe before, explaining how this delicious complete meal can be adjusted to work with whatever greens and starch you have handy.  In this post, I’m making a specific version of it, helpfully illustrated with photos for all you visual learners.

Bonus Parenting Tip: If you have a child who is old enough to use a camera and is casting about restlessly saying, “I want somebody to dooo something with me!” on a Sunday evening just as you are about to start dinner, ask him to be your photographer for a cooking article!  It will keep him busy, and it will enable you to get photos of every step of the process without having to pause the food preparation to wash your hands so that you don’t get fish fat and onion juice all over the camera!  (That is the reason I don’t take photos of cookery more often.  Well, also it’s because taking the extra time to load photos into a post rarely seems worth it to me–not being a visual learner myself.)

All photos in this article were taken by Nicholas Efran, age 10.  Thanks for your help, Nicholas!ingredients

To make 4 servings of this particular version of Lemon Creamy Salmon with Tangy Greens, you will need:

  • 15 oz. canned wild Alaskan salmon, including liquid
  • 1 small onion
  • 2 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 4 cups fresh kale
  • 1/2 lb. whole-wheat rotini pasta
  • 2 tsp. instant vegetable broth mix (We get this in bulk at the food co-op.)
  • 3/4 cup plain yogurt
  • 1/2 tsp. dried thyme
  • 2 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • 1/3 cup olive oil (separately from above oil)
  • 1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
  • 2-3 cloves garlic
  • 1/8 tsp. salt
  • 1 cup dried cranberries

Read more…

Tetrazzini

This rich, filling casserole is a wonderful comfort food for chilly days!  It’s made with real ingredients–no canned soup–yet it’s fairly easy to put together.  Turkey Tetrazzini is traditional, but my family usually doesn’t eat meat other than fish, so we most often make Tetrazzini with canned Alaskan salmon.  We’ve also made it with cubes of tofu.

I started with a recipe that I copied out of a magazine (I think it was Redbook) when I was in college.  I’ve made a few modifications to the seasoning and rewritten the instructions in an order that I can follow confidently–instead of finding that I’ve forgotten crucial steps so that the sauce gets lumpy while I race around insanely.  I’m a person who usually avoids making white sauce, but it’s worth it for delicious Tetrazzini!

This recipe is easily modified to use odds and ends that you happen to have on hand.  Only the sauce ingredients really need to be measured; all the other quantities are approximate.  Don’t have peas?  Cauliflower or broccoli or some other vegetable can be substituted. Don’t have as much salmon (or alternative protein) as the recipe says?  Throw in more vegetables.  Use up pasta, fish/meat, cheese, or vegetables left over from another meal–it’s a great way to make Thanksgiving turkey taste different!–or purposely cook extra of these ingredients when making another meal and then make Tetrazzini a day or two later.  The quantity of bell pepper in this recipe is less than a whole pepper, so it’s perfect for using up a random leftover chunk. Read more…

Lemon Creamy Salmon with Tangy Greens

This is a meal my family has enjoyed repeatedly since it was inspired by a chicken recipe more than two years ago.  We rarely eat chicken and never cook it at home, so we’ve always made this with canned wild Alaskan salmon.  I’ve now made enough changes to the original recipe that I feel this qualifies as a different recipe. You can make this meal for $5 or less if you stock up on canned salmon when it goes on sale, and you choose wisely on the greens and carbohydrate–the recipe is very flexible about those specifics. There are five components to this meal, which picky people may prefer to eat separately: salmon in sauce, greens, dressing, dried cranberries, and a carbohydrate.  The way I serve this meal for myself is to put the salmon on top of the carbohydrate, and the dressing and cranberries on top of the greens. To make 4 servings, you will need:

  • 15 oz. canned or pre-cooked salmon
  • 1 small or 1/2 large onion
  • 2 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 1/2 cup vegetable broth
  • 3/4 cup plain yogurt or sour cream
  • 1/2 tsp. thyme
  • 2 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • 4 servings prepared carbohydrate: pasta, rice, baked or mashed potato, toasted hearty bread, etc.
  • 4 cups fresh, or 2 cups shredded frozen, dark green leaves: kale, spinach, Swiss chard, etc.
  • 1/3 cup olive oil (separately from above oil)
  • 1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
  • 2-3 cloves garlic
  • 1/8 tsp. salt
  • 1 cup dried cranberries (or other dried fruit)

The first step is to consider what kind of carb and what kind of greens you are using.  If the carb is not yet cooked, start cooking it first.  If you’ll be serving toast, wait until last to toast it so it will be warm.  If you want to eat the greens raw, all you have to do is rinse them and tear larger leaves into bite-size pieces.  If the greens are frozen, or they’re fresh but you want to serve them cooked, start cooking them–I often use frozen kale, just put it in a covered pot with a small amount of water, and poke it with a spoon every few minutes until all the chunks are broken up and it is a slightly less bright green.

Drain the salmon and remove unwanted bones.

Dice the onion.  Cook it in 2 Tbsp. oil until it begins to brown.

Stir in broth and bring to a boil.

Reduce heat to medium and stir in yogurt, thyme, and lemon juice.  (If you used leftover cooked salmon that was not salted, instead of canned salmon, you may want to add some salt.)  Stir for about 2 minutes.

Add the salmon.  Break it up into small chunks.  Heat for another few minutes, stirring occasionally. Meanwhile, make the dressing, either by shaking in a small glass jar or by whisking in a small bowl: Crush the garlic and mix it with 1/3 cup oil and the vinegar and salt.

Serve the salmon, carb, greens, dressing, and cranberries together or separately, as desired.

Visit the Hearth & Soul Blog Hop and Real Food Friday for more recipes!  Visit Fabulously Frugal Thursday and Thrifty Thursday for more affordable ideas!

Baked Fish with Clementines

This recipe works with any citrus fruit, but I made it most recently with clementines because they seem especially abundant and affordable this winter, so we had bought a big box! It is a good way to use up clementines (or an orange or lemon, or probably it would work with limes or a grapefruit) that are getting kind of old for fresh eating but aren’t actually moldy or vinegary-smelling.

This recipe also works with either mild white fish or salmon. We usually eat it with rice and a green vegetable such as broccoli. I like to put my fish and vegetable on top of the rice and then spoon the sauce from the fish pan over the whole meal.

To make 3 main-dish servings, you will need:

  • 3 fish fillets (fresh, frozen, or thawed)
  • 2 clementines, 1 orange or lemon, or 1/4 cup frozen concentrated orange juice (scoop it out of the can and then mix up the rest of the juice for drinking)
  • 1/4 onion, or 1 green onion
  • 2 tsp. dried parsley
  • 1 Tbsp. olive oil
  • butter to grease the baking pan

Consult fish packaging for appropriate oven temperature and baking time. Preheat oven.

Dice onion. (If green onion, use both white and green parts.) Cook onion and parsley in oil in a small pot until onion begins to brown.

Peel clementines and slice them horizontally (across the sections) about 1/4 inch thick. Remove any seeds.

Grease baking pan. Lay fish in it. Lay slices of clementines over the fish. Top with onion mixture. (If using concentrated juice, stir it into the onion mixture before spooning it over the fish.)

Bake until fish easily flakes apart when you poke it with a fork. Serve with some fruit on each portion.

Visit the Hearth & Soul Blog Hop for more recipes!

P.S. Apologies to my subscribers for the long gap between posts! Right after returning from our Christmas travels, my whole family was stricken with viral bronchitis. Although it will not harm the baby, my being pregnant has made the illness especially depleting for me, and I have spent more than two weeks mostly lying in bed coughing. I am finally getting better, and writing this post and the one that will go up tomorrow is my “work” for today to test whether I am able to return to my job tomorrow. I hope all my readers are having a healthier, happier new year than I have so far!